Will the long-term effects of Coronavirus affect my ability to work?

The long-term health effects of COVID-19 are still largely unknown because the virus itself is still only months old and research on this has been limited.  In large part, researchers are still trying to determine the disease’s short-term effects.  However, many people who have recovered from COVID-19 are reporting long-term problems as a result of contracting the disease.  These problems have included vascular problems, like blood clots, stroke, and embolisms; damage to organs, including the heart and lungs; and neurological symptoms, such as headaches, dizziness, and loss of taste and smell.  Some have also reported problems with chronic skin rashes and so-called “COVID toes”, where a person’s toes become red and painful.  Viral infections like Coronavirus have also been known to trigger chronic fatigue syndrome in some people that can last for months or years.  A study of the long-term effects of SARS, a coronavirus similar to COVID-19, showed that 22 percent of the study participants were not able to return to full-time work one year after infection.  That’s a startling statistic, especially in light of the fact that COVID-19 seems to be causing more severe symptoms in some than other recent coronaviruses like SARS.  As we work our way through this pandemic, it’s likely we will start to see how the long-term effects of this disease are impacting those who were infected.  If those long-term effects are severe, it could affect a person’s ability to work and Social Security Disability may be something such a person should consider.  If you have questions about your eligibility for Social Security Disability or Supplemental Security Income, please call us today.

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